Syncing iPhone Photos with Luminar 3

I have been mulling around writing this article for a while.

I was wondering if it was really worth writing the piece and if people will actually use what I wanted to present.

You see, as with any great idea, you need an audience.

This Blog has seen better days… :-)

Notwithstanding, I decided to move pass through my self-doubt and write the article. I sincerely hope you like it and decide to spread the word.

Workflow

Skylum has outlined a roadmap that includes Cloud Syncing for photos. It seems like is coming on phase III of the development cycle.

So while we wait for that to come, I started thinking about easier ways to move my photos from my mobile decides (iPhones and iPads in my case) to the computer; so I could edit them in Luminar 3 with Libraries.

I know that iOS users can count on AirDrop to transfer photos, but I wanted a more automated way of doing so.

The idea was outlined in this steps:

  1. Take iPhone/iPad (don’t judge) photos

  2. Run some sort of App that syncs photos with my computer

  3. Add folder to Luminar 3 with Libraries, a sort of watch folder.

  4. Import/Organize photos in Luminar

  5. Edit Imported Photos.

Enter Resilio Sync

I have owned a license for the Resilio Sync apps since the company started and before it was called Resilio Sync (It used to be called BitTorrent Sync).

CleanShot 2019-01-24 at 08.24.53@2x.png

Resilio Sync is an application that allows you to sync folders and files between devices (Mobiles, computers, tablets, etc) using the power of BitTorrent.

The application is FREE for individuals but it also has a Pro (Paid) version. I believe it runs on any platform you can think of.

In my case, it was exactly what I needed to accessorize my Luminar 3 with Libraries workflow.

Installed Resilio Sync on my iPhone, iPad and Main Computer, and then proceeded to create a Camera Backup Sync on the Mobile devices. Once the link between the mobile devices was created, all it was needed was to locate the folder on the Main Computer where the photos were Synced.

Clicking on the Preferences on the Main Computer shows the location of the Folder…

Clicking on the Preferences on the Main Computer shows the location of the Folder…

Importing Photos into Luminar 3 with Libraries

After opening Luminar 3 with Libraries, it was time to add the Resilio Sync folder to the application in order to import the photos.

CleanShot 2019-01-24 at 08.41.11@2x.png

Clicking on the + icon on the Folders section in the Library Module, allows us to browse to the location of the Synced photos. After you hit “Open”, Luminar 3 is going to keep an eye on that folder and any time you sync photos from your mobile devices, they will show up inside Luminar.

All that is left, is to organize them according to your Folder structure in your computer. Easy as pie!

Did I mention that ALL files types are synced? In other words, your RAW (HEIC files), JPEGS, TIFF and PNG files are all synced between the mobile devices and the computer. A really powerful workflow in my opinion.

From there editing is just one click into the Edit Module.

Is not a perfect solution, as the sync is a TWO way sync. In other words, if you make changes or move the photos to other folders, Resilio Sync is going to try to sync again the next time you open the application on the mobile device. I wish there was a way to configure the mobile client to do a one way sync.

In my case, it works until Skylum comes out with a Cloud Sync Solution.

What do you think? Is this something you could use? If you like the solution I hope you decide to spread the word. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask in the comment section below.

Luminar 3 with Libraries

Skylum just released (December 18th 2018) the new version of Luminar, called Luminar 3 with Libraries.

The Brooklyn Diner

I downloaded the installation files and immediately told it where my photos where on my external hard drive.

I can tell you that when I started working with it I was giddy…

I don’t think I have ever been so happy to work with my pictures. I was able to organize almost 10 years worth of photos in about four hours. Something that I have been putting off month after month with Adobe Lightroom; Luminar allowed me to finish it quickly and easily.

But that is not why I was giddy.

I was happy because Adobe has finally gotten some competition and because I am seeing the possibilities of this application. I sincerely hope that Skylum continues their efforts to beat Adobe Lightroom to a pulp.

Capto_Capture 2018-12-20_11-05-51_AM.jpg

I don’t want you to think that I hate Adobe. I don’t. I just think their practices trying to force everybody into their cloud model is wrong.

They basically say: “Hey, we are the only game in town with regards to photo editing so now you have to pay us US$120 a year and more for hosting your photos in the cloud”.

And believe me, all they want is for you to buy their VERY EXPENSIVE CLOUD STORAGE.

Skylum has Cloud storage in their Roadmap. Not sure what that’s going to be, but in any case I just think for now, this suits my needs.

It’s also a beautiful program, to look at it and to work on it.

There are some quirky things (I will say more than a few) but that is to be expected from a version 1.0 (or 3.0) of a software.

Skylum intentions are to do a fast and furious update plan for the end of the year and the next quarter. All those updates, according to the company, are going to be free to current users of the application.

I still have about 10 more years of photos to organize, but yesterday I did a whole year in about one hour as I become more accustomed to the way the application works.

I think Luminar 3 with Libraries is a first rate contender for the crown of Digital Assets Manager (DAM) in my computer.

I can’t wait to see what Skylum has in store.

Gotta get back, back to the past...

"Gotta get Back, back to the past..."—Samurai Jack

Technology this days advances at what seems to be the speed of light. Ten years ago we didn't have 3/4 of the things we have today. 20 years ago, none of them existed (if their present form, that is.)

We are presented with new and fascinating things that make our everyday lives easier and more pleasant.

My wife is often complaining to me when I buy new gadgets: "Why do you need that? You didn't have that when you were young...".

My answer is always: "Because it didn't exist back then!!".

One of the things that seem to be advancing at a faster pace than anything else is Image Editing Software.

Ten years ago, the market was pretty much dominated by the top dog: Adobe Photoshop.

Nowadays, there are applications on our mobile phones that rival (and in certain ways surpass) what we can do with other desktop image editors.

This is especially relevant because of the immense library of photos that lay dormant on our hard drives.

The best way to learn a new application is to take it through its paces. What better way to do that, than to take our old photos that we thought were lost? We all have images in our libraries that probably have one star or are flagged as rejected. Maybe is an image that we thought was good, but not good enough?

We can take those photos and put them through the new algorithms that are present today in programs like MacPhun's Luminar or Topaz Studio.

Back to the Past

The technology on those and other applications has been designed to take advantage of new and better processors. That, together with faster computers and algorithms make editions that we never thought were possible 10 years ago.

Take the image that is shown here. It was taken in August 2013, just four years ago, using a Nikon D300s (my main camera at that time).

The photo was one of a large series of flower photos. It was taken while I was testing a new lens (The Nikon Nifty 50mm) and it was one of the discarded photos.

I was watching some videos on YouTube about processing photos using Topaz Studio and was inspired to try some of the filters included with the professional package.

A quick run through Topaz Studio, with a couple of quick presets and this image developed.

A much, much better rendition of a discarded photo and one that was worth sharing. Probably a better photo than the one that was chosen.

We might be underestimating some hidden jewels in our archives!

See what Develops

We never know what we might develop using a new software.

This is just a simple example, with not a lot of editing, but it serves to illustrate that we have in our hands a much better technology that can rescue lost of forgotten images.

Our tastes on what is good also change with time as we hone our skills, so maybe what we like now is totally different that what we liked back then.

What do you think? Have you gone back to edit old images with new applications? Have you been able to rescue some photos?

Leave your thoughts in the comment section below.

Back to the past

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